Adding value to your home: Build a bullnose verandah!

Many home owners wish to add value to the investment of their home, and one way in which this can be done easily and reasonably inexpensively is through the addition of covered outdoor areas - such as a bullnose verandah. Not only will a bullnose verandah add value to your home, it will also enhance the liveability of your home whilst you’re there, giving you additional living space all year round.

 

Bullnose verandahs

Bullnose roofing is a traditional Australian verandah design that finishes off a home beautifully and adds great aesthetic value. Bullnose roofing is widely used in regional areas and is also found in Australian capital cities on terrace houses and is still seen extensively throughout inner city suburbs.

 

Bullnose verandahs are joined directly to the exterior of your home and generally run along the length of the house. They can be built at the time the house is built, or added on later. The width of the bullnose verandah is only limited by the room that you have available, and can come as wide as five and a half metres or as slim as just over one metre.

 

The traditional cover for a bullnose verandah is curved iron and can come in a wide range of colors to suit your home’s other features. A colorbond verandah roof can freshen up older properties, giving them a new lease on life for a low investment.

 

A bullnose verandah has excellent cooling properties. In times past, instead of air-conditioners, homes were built with a bullnose verandah all the way around to keep the heat out. Even putting a bullnose verandah on one side of your home will have immediate benefits to the interior temperature of the rooms behind it and will save you money on air-conditioning costs. With electricity prices set to rise, a bullnose verandah is a much more sustainable option.

 

Tips for choosing a bullnose verandah:

  • Make sure you have adequate height for a bullnose verandah - The minimum height, on average, at the house is 2700mm for a full bullnose roof or 2400mm for a half bullnose roof. Factors such as the width of the verandah (the wider it is, the more hight you need) and the deck material will impact on the height required. We recommend that you seek advice for your individual circumstances.

  • Use the recommended bullnose rafter spacing - Ensure that you use the recommended spacing for the bullnose rafters, as they support the curved iron. No support for the iron can result in a sagging roof.

  • DIY verandah kit or have it built by someone else? - Some bullnose verandah suppliers can provide you with a complete bullnose verandah kit, providing you with everything you’ll need to build your bullnose verandah. This can help keep costs down if you’re good with a hammer.

  • Finish your bullnose verandah off with decorative timber components - Nothing finishes a bullnose verandah off like decorative timber brackets at the corner of the verandah posts. Similarly, installing frieze or balustrading, if the verandah decking is raised, completes the look of the verandah as well as keeping children safe from a drop.

Keywords: verandahs, bullnose verandas, bullnose verandahs, bullnose roofing, diy verandah, timber verandahs

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Adding value to your home: Build a carport!

Many home owners wish to add value to the investment of their home, and one way in which this can be done reasonably easily and inexpensively is through the addition of a covered outdoor area - such as a carport. Not only will a carport add value to your home, it will also enhance the liveability of your home whilst you’re there, giving you additional living space all year round.

 

Carports

Carports are a functional and beautiful addition to your home and offer great flexibility as to the size, shape and material that it is constructed with. Carports are extremely popular as they provide protection for your car as well as adding value to your home.

 

Carports come in all shapes and sizes and are only limited by the room available. The most attractive carports are built using timber, as they have natural beauty. Timber carport roof trusses are visually stunning. They give that unique “webbed” look to your carport roof that will have all your friends talking. Much more attractive, compared to cold steel.

 

One of the fastest and most effective ways to build a carport is to use prefabricated carport trusses. Prefabricated carport trusses are consistent in shape and quality, ensuring your carport roof is structurally sound and looks good.

 

Another attractive alternative, is to have an arched carport roof. This option is popular with modern homes and suits a wide variety of homes. You can choose to use curved iron or laserlight as the carport cover, in a wide range of colors to suit your home. Your new carport can give an older home an instant face-lift.

 

You can also choose to paint your carport roof or retain the natural timber look. For the natural timber look, your carport roof can be kept safe from rotting and borers if treated with a preservative, so that your carport will last as long as the house does. Just ask your carport supplier to have the carport roof trusses “treated” when you order them.

 

Tips for choosing a carport:

  • DIY carport or have it built for you? - If you’re handy with a hammer, some carport suppliers can provide you with a carport kit and you can build your carport yourself. This can help keep costs down.

  • Choose a carport roof that suits the existing style of your home - Keeping your carport in the same style as the rest of the house ensures that your new carport will look attractive. A mis-matched style will look messy.

  • Ensure your carport posts can be fixed securely to - or into - the ground - If your posts are not securely fixed, your carport frame could shift in strong winds or extreme weather.

Keywords: carport, carports, carport kits, carport designs, prefabricated carports, building a carport, timber carports

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Adding value to your home: Build a patio!

Many home owners wish to add value to the investment of their home, and one way in which this can be done reasonably easily and inexpensively is through the addition of a covered outdoor area - such as a patio. Not only will a patio add value to your home, it will also enhance the liveability of your home whilst you’re there, giving you additional living space all year round.

 

Patios

Patios are a functional and beautiful addition to your home and offer great flexibility as to the size, shape and material that it is constructed with. Patios are extremely popular in the Australian culture, as they provide welcome shade during our hot summers and protection from wet weather in the cooler months.

 

Patios come in all shapes and sizes and are only limited by the room available. The most attractive patio designs are built using timber, as they retain the wood’s natural beauty. Timber patio roof trusses are visually stunning. They give that unique “webbed” look to your patio roof that will have all your friends talking. Much more attractive, compared to cold steel.

 

One of the fastest and most effective ways to build a patio is to use prefabricated roof trusses. Prefabricated roof trusses are consistent in shape and quality, ensuring your patio roof is structurally sound and looks good.

 

Another attractive alternative, is to have an arched patio roof. This option is popular with modern homes and suits a wide variety of outdoor living areas. You can choose to use curved iron or laserlight as the patio cover, in a wide range of colors to suit your home. Your patio cover can give an older home an instant face-lift.

 

You can also choose to paint your patio roof or retain the natural timber look. For the natural timber look, your patio roof can be kept safe from rotting and borers if treated with a preservative, so that your patio will last as long as the house does. Just ask your patio roof supplier to have the patio roof trusses “treated” when you order them.

 

Tips for choosing a patio:

  • DIY patio or have it built for you - If you’re handy with a hammer, some patio roof suppliers can provide you with a patio kit and you can build your patio yourself. This can help keep costs down.

  • Choose a patio roof that suits the existing style of your home - Keeping your patio in the same style as the rest of the house ensures that your new patio will look attractive. A mis-matched style will make it seem as if the patio has been added on.

  • Check that you have adequate height - The bottom of the side beam of the patio should be no less than 2050mm, which is the standard door height.

  • Ensure your patio posts can be fixed securely to - or into - the ground - If your posts are not securely fixed, your patio frame could shift in strong winds or extreme weather.

Keywords: patio, patios, patio covers, patio designs, diy patio, patio roofing, patio roof designs, patio design ideas

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Tips to beautify your outdoor living areas

Australians love their backyards … long summer days in the sun with the family, the traditional BBQ with mates, kicking the footy round with the kids …

 

As we spend so much time out of doors, Australians are obsessed with creating beautiful outdoor living areas. The additional benefit of course, is that a well designed outdoor living area can add significant dollar value your home.

 

Here are some ways that you can beautify your outdoor living areas:

 

Add a bullnose verandah

Bullnose roofing is a traditional Australian verandah design that finishes off a home beautifully and adds great aesthetic value. Bullnose roofing is widely used in regional areas and is also found in Australian capital cities on terrace houses and is still seen extensively throughout inner city suburbs.

 

Bullnose verandahs are joined directly to the exterior of your home and generally run along the length of the house. They can be built at the time the house is built, or added on later. The width of the bullnose verandah is only limited by the room that you have available, and can come as wide as five and a half metres or as slim as just over one metre.

 

The traditional cover for a bullnose verandah is curved iron and can come in a wide range of colors to suit your home’s other features. A colorbond verandah roof can freshen up older properties, giving them a new lease on life for a low investment.

 

A bullnose verandah has excellent cooling properties. In times past, instead of air-conditioners, homes were built with a bullnose verandah all the way around to keep the heat out. Even putting a bullnose verandah on one side of your home will have immediate benefits to the interior temperature of the rooms behind it and will save you money on air-conditioning costs. With electricity prices set to rise, a bullnose verandah is a much more sustainable option.

 

And of course, the decking of the bullnose verandah provides you with a covered area to sit and enjoy the ambience of the Australian outdoors.

 

Add a carport

Does your car currently have a home? You can protect your car and add value and beauty to your home when you add a timber carport.

 

A fresh and attractive colorbond roof on your carport will catch the eye, as well as the strong timber lines of the carport frame. You can find carports with different roofing profiles that will match the style of your home and become an attractive feature in itself.

 

Instead of having to fit a carport to your roofline, you can get a free-standing carport. Place it wherever you wish - or wherever you have the room - without having to reshape your roofline. Carport kits can be assembled in a weekend, and if you’re handy with tools, you won’t even have to hire a builder, saving you time and money.

 

Add a patio

Patios are a functional and beautiful addition to your home and offer great flexibility as to the size, shape and material that it is constructed with. Patios are extremely popular in the Australian culture, as they provide welcome shade during our hot summers and protection from wet weather in the cooler months.

 

Patios come in all shapes and sizes and are only limited by the room available. The most attractive patios are built using timber, as they retain the wood’s natural beauty. Timber patio roof trusses are visually stunning. They give that unique “webbed” look to your patio roof that will have all your friends talking. Much more attractive, compared to cold steel.

 

One of the fastest and most effective ways to build a patio is to use prefabricated patio roof trusses. Prefabricated patio roof trusses are consistent in shape and quality, ensuring your patio roof is structurally sound and looks good.

 

Another attractive patio roof alternative, is to have an arched patio roof. This option is popular with modern homes and suits a wide variety of outdoor living areas. You can choose to use curved iron or laserlight as the patio cover, in a wide range of colors to suit your home. Your patio cover can give an older home an instant face-lift.

 

You can also choose to paint your patio roof or retain the natural timber look. For the natural timber look, your patio roof can be kept safe from rotting and borers if treated with a preservative, so that your patio will last as long as the house does. Just ask your patio roof supplier to have the patio roof trusses “treated” when you order them.

 

Keywords: verandahs, bullnose verandas, bullnose verandahs, bullnose roofing, diy verandah, carport, carports, carport kits, carport designs, prefabricated carports, patio, patios, patio covers, patio designs, diy patio

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Choosing the right carport for your home

Adding a carport to your home is a great way to protect your car from the weather, increase your outdoor living areas, and add value to your home. They can also make your home more attractive. So what are the available carport options and how do you work out which carport is right for you?

 

First, let’s look at the sorts of carports available:

  • Incorporated into your roofline - These carports are generally built when the house is built and the roofline of the house covers the carport area. Obviously, this is more suited to home owners who are having a new house built, rather than adding one on at a later date due to the cost of adjusting your roofline. The roof covering is generally tile to match the rest of the house roof.

  • Stand-alone carports - These carports can be added onto existing homes, and are free-standing from the main home structure. Because of this, they can offer greater flexibility as to their position, style and whether they can double up as an extra outdoor living area. The carport roof covering is generally colorbond, which can come in a variety of colors, and you can also choose to incorporate laserlight if the carport will also be used as an entertainment area, to allow the natural light to shine in.

What about the materials that the carports are made from?

There are generally two options:

  1. Timber - Timber frame carports are attractive and you should be able to find a variety of carport roofing styles available, as the timber allows greater flexibility in the design. What about rotting I hear you say? These days, outdoor timber components can be “treated” to resist rotting and borers, so the timber will last as long as the steel components.

  2. Steel - Steel carport come in a variety of sizes, but can look much plainer, as they work with straight lines only. Steel carports can cost you less however, but you won’t add as much value to your home, and the outdoor living experience can be diminished.

Who will build your carport?

Are you good with a hammer and know your way around tools? Or will you need some assistance? There are now carport kits available that can help you keep costs down by building it yourself. If you’re not good with tools, purchasing a carport kit can still work for you, as you will then only need to pay the builder for putting it up. Builders can sometimes ‘pad’ their quotes for organising the materials, so if this is something you’ve organised yourself, you can realise the savings.

 

Choosing the right carport design for your home:

  • Look at the design of your house - Is it Edwardian? Modern? Or somewhere in between? When choosing the design, try and match the carport to your existing house style, as it will look more attractive and look like it’s meant to be there.

  • Also look at your garden area - Do you have any garden furnishings, such as garden arbours, outdoor seating arrangements or park benches? What are these made from? If you primarily have timber garden furnishings, then timber carports may suit your home better. If steel, then consider a steel design.

  • Look at your garden edging - If you have timber retaining walls, edging or other timber decorations on your house, than a timber carport will match the rest of your outdoor design, whereas a steel design may appear out of place.

  • What is the right price for you? - Everyone is cost conscious these days, and you need to weigh up your reason for building a carport. Is it just to protect your car, or are you looking at using the carport area for outdoor entertainment as well? Preferably consider the latter, as this will add significant value to your house, whilst also improving your living enjoyment.

    Adding a carport can be a reasonably considerable investment, so you want to get as much bang for your buck as possible. Also keep in mind that other cost savings may be available, such as a reduction in your insurance, as the car will now be kept under cover, and will ensure the finish on your car lasts longer.

Whichever option you choose, make sure that you purchase from a reputable company that can provide you with comprehensive information before the purchase and offer support after the purchase.

 

Keywords: carport, carports, carport kits, carport designs, prefabricated carports, building a carport, timber carports

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The new home improvement craze: Window awnings

Home owners, renovators, builders - they’re all jumping on board the latest home improvement craze! Window awnings - sometimes called window canopies - have experienced a surge in popularity recently. So what are window awnings / canopies all about?

  • Window awnings can reduce your energy bills - A window canopy will keep your rooms cooler in summer and warmer in winter, so that you can turn off your air conditioner or heater and save on electricity costs.

  • Window awnings stop unwanted weather reaching the window - No one likes scrubbing the windows! With a timber window awning, you don’t need to. And you’ll also extend the life of your window sills and frames, as they won’t be subjected to as much weather wear.

  • Window awnings stop sun bleaching - Curtains, bed covers and fabric furnishings are expensive. Yours will last longer, when they’re protected with a window canopy.

  • Window awnings are a fast and inexpensive way to add a stunning feature to your home - Improve the resale value of your home and enjoy the envious stares of your neighbours. Within as little as 1 hour you can install a window canopy and not only enjoy the benefits they bring, but also add a attractive feature to your home (wider windows will take a little longer).

  • Window awnings allow you to leave your window open during a refreshing rain shower.

  • Window awnings are made to last - Quality timber window canopies are made using radiata pine and treated with Light Organic Solvent Preservative (LOSP) to H3 level (protection for components above the ground), to resist rotting and borers. (Note: Because the timber has been treated, you will need to use a primer before painting.)

So get on board today and join the new home improvement craze!

 

Keywords: window awnings, window canopies, outdoor window awnings, timber awnings, timber window awnings, wooden window awnings

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Simple ways to decorate your verandah (and home…)

The family home is usually one of the biggest investments you'll make. And of course, you want to make the most of your investment and make your home as beautiful as you can. There are some simple - yet effective - ways that you can make your home more attractive, by adding decorative timber elements to your roofline or verandah. Here's some ideas.

 

Frieze


Decorative frieze runs along the top of your verandah, just under the roofline and is usually composed of slats, either plain or with a decorative motif included at regular intervals. Frieze is usually about 300mm high, which still allows enough head room underneath, whilst providing a pleasing decorative element to your verandah.

 

Balustrading

Complementing the frieze along the top of your verandah, balustrading will complete the look, while also keeping your loved ones safe from a fall! Balustrading can match the frieze with plain or motif slats and the handrail can come in many different sizes and profiles.

 

Both balustrading and frieze are easy to assemble. Here's some tips to keep in mind when assembling them:

 

  1. Standard slat spacing is at 150mm centres. When working out where to space them to fit your individual dimensions, divide the length of the post spacing (not the actual length of the rail) by 150.
  2. Decide how many motif slats you want to fit within the length of the balustrading or frize, then lay the slats out in a pattern. For example:

    I I O I I I O I I I O I I I O I I

    This shows how many plain and how many motif slat you'll need.
  3. Frieze panels can be nailed in at the top and bottom with bullet head nails. Remember to putty the nail holes in the bottom rail.

Post Corner Brackets

 

Post corner brackets are the right angle decorative timber pieces that attach to a verandah post and the underside of either the verandah roof or frieze panels. They come in a variety of designs, and you should be able to find a style to suit your home, regardless of whether you have a modern or federation style home.

 

Post corner brackets are very simple to install, requiring just a screw on the top and side to hold it into place, yet can dramatically change the look of your home quickly.

 

Eaves Brackets

 

Similar in appearance to post corner brackets, eaves brackets are fitted to the underside of your eaves at regular intervals. Again, you should be able to find a number of designs and styles to suit any roofline.

 

Gable Decoration

 

Do you have a gable roofline? Why not put the finishing touch on your gable end, with a gable finial? Gable finials are usually attached to the peak of the gable, and can come with either a spike or a ball at either end. Keep in mind that the deeper your gable roof, the longer your gable finial should be.

 

Because you have a face on a gable roofline, you can also get gable fretwork in many styles and designs. Instead of just a blank wall, gable fretwork provides that added detail that will complete your roof nicely.

 

All of these suggestions have one thing in common - they're simple, but can dramatically change the look of your home in a very short period of time, for usually a minimal investment. You don't always need to go big to get a big effect!

 

Keywords: verandah, verandah designs, verandah, balustrading, frieze, verandahs, patios, patio, outdoor area, home improvement, frieze panels, gable finial, post corner brackets

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How to install a Lyrebird Window Awning

When using Lyrebird Window Awnings, please note that all timber for outdoor use should be primed - prior to fixing - whether it is treated or not. LOSP treated timber should be primed with an oil based primer.

  1. Fasten the brackets to the wall with the screws or dynabolts provided with your Window Awning Kit in at least two places. This can be done as follows:

    1. Drill 10mm holes in each of the brackets, the top hole off-centre to by-pass the slats.
    2. Then, mark on the wall where the pilot holes have to be drilled.

  2. Decide whether you want the top batten to be fixed to the wall (the wall may be too uneven or too rough a surface), or between the brackets. Extra screws are provided for fixing to the wall.

  3. You also need to decide if the battens are to be fixed between (our recommendation) or on top of the brackets.

  4. Cut the battens to length.

  5. Fix the top, then the front batten.

  6. Fix the centre batten if provided for wider windows.

  7. Cut the fascia to length (determine how you want it centred), and fit, allowing for the roofline to continue over it.

  8. Fix the roof sheets; the top row of screws go in after the flashing is in place, so that they can fix both the flashing and roof sheets.

  9. Pre-drill and fit side flashing as described below:

    Pre-drill the top flashing with 1/8" holes, at about 900mm centres. The wider side can go either against the wall or on the roof. The top flashing should cover the sides.

If you need any assistance during the installation, please don't hesitate to contact us.

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How to assemble Lyrebird Friezes and Balustrading

  1. On the bottom rail, mark the centre. Note that the rail may be cut longer than the required post spacing. Ignore the extra. Standard slat spacing is at 150mm centres. Divide the length of the post spacing (not the actual length of the rail) by 150. For example:

    2700 / 150 = 18

    The total number of slats for this length is 18.

  2. Determine how many motif slats you want in this length, eg. 4. That gives 14 plain slats. Lay the slats out in a pattern. For example:

    I I O I I I O I I I O I I I O I I

    This shows that you need only 13 plain slats. The total width of the slats is 4 x 90mm (motif slats) plus 13 x 43mm (plain slats) = 360 + 559 = 919mm. 2700 - 919 = 1781mm. This is the total length of the filler between the slats. 17 slats gives 18 spaces, at 98.9mm. Optimum slat spacing is between 95 and 105mm.

  3. Cut the 36 pieces of filler (top and bottom) at 99mm.

  4. Brush glue into the bottom trench (not too thickly!). Starting in the centre, fit the slats and filler in the trench. Be sure to keep the slats square to the rail. Let the glue set, but before it is set too rigid, start adding the top rail.

  5. Mark at one end of the top rail where the first slat is to be located. Brush glue into the top trench. Turn the bottom rail upside down and fit the first slat into its marked place. One by one, fit the other slats into the top rail. Verify that the shole assembly is square. Now fit the filler in the top rail, between the slats, with no gap between slat and filler.

  6. Frieze panels may be nailed in top and/or bottom with bullet head nails; putty the nail holes in the bottom rail. Top and bottom rails in baluster panels can be tied together until the glue has set completely.

  7. Cut off the excess length to fit the panel between the posts.

If you need any assistance during the assembly, please don't hesitate to contact us.

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How to construct a Lyrebird Standard Carport Kit

All Lyrebird Enterprises Standard Carport Kit timber components are LOSP (H3) treated against warping, rotting and borers. Most components are pre-cut and pre-drilled.

 

Important: All timber carport components should be primed with oil-based primer before fixing.

  1. Locate post positions, centred as shown on your kit drawings.

  2. Erect posts as determined beforehand. Verify overall dimensions as shown on drawings.

  3. Trip tops of posts to allow for desired clearance under Fascia Beams.

  4. Fix Fascia Beams with Cup Head bolts. Fix posts 45mm from end of fascia.

  5. Using pre-cut purlins as guides, locate position of and fix Joist Hangers ready for trusses.

  6. Fix Smart-Arch Trusses, front and back first, then middle. Front and back Trusses are screwed to posts, then screwed to Fascia with 14g Batten Screws.

  7. Middle Trusses are screwed after being seated and nailed in Joist Hangers.

  8. Fix Purlins between Trusses with 14g Batten Screws.

  9. Mount Gutter Brackets with Gang Nails. Ensure gutter line runs at slight angle for water run-off.

  10. Lay the Roof Sheets. Do not screw the top end of the sheets until the ridge capping is in place.

  11. Fix Barge Capping.

  12. Position and fix Ridge Capping.

  13. Fix Gutter. Drill downpipe Pop holes. Fix Gutter End Caps. Attach Rain Chain.

If you need any assistance during the construction, please don't hesitate to contact us.

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LOSP treatment facts

  • LOSP provides cost effective, long term protection against termite damage to the structural elements of a building.

  • LOSP conforms to Australian Standards and the Building Code of Australia requirements.

  • It works and handles like normal dry structural pine softwood.

  • It's non corrosive and non conducting of electricity. It's safe for users, owners and the environment.

  • The material is processed utilising vacuum and pressure impregnating the chemical into the cellular structure of the timber.

  • The process doesn't wet the timber, so no swelling or distortion of the timber occurs. Components can be cut to size prior to treatment.

  • LOSP treated timber is non-corrosive to bolts or nail plates.

  • LOSP treated timber can be painted, stained or oiled. If painting is required, oil based undercoats are recommended.

  • Unpainted surfaces exposed to the elements need regular applications of a high quality timber finish.

  • Any residual solvent evaporates after 8-12 hours of opening a pack, leaving the timber odour free.

  • LOSP H2 & H3 can be used Nationwide - there are no regulatory or geographic restrictions.

  • This treatment is resistant to the most voracious termites.

Frequently asked questions

 

Q Is the product safe for people using it, and for the homeowner?
A The only thing left in H2 LOSP termite resistant timber in the long term is a synthetic pyrethroid, considered some of the least harmful to all mammals of any insecticide. Permethrin has low human toxicity and is essentially trapped in the fibres of the timber as it is essentially non volatile and non water soluble. In H3 LOSP timber there is the added organotin fungicide present, which is also has very low solubility in water. Both products remaining in the timber have had their use in these situations approved.

 

Q How long will the termite protection last?
A H2 LOSP timber when used in the right hazard application (dry, aboveground situations) is designed to last at least for the economic life of the structure or greater than 25 years.

 

Q Does treatment affect strength or dimensional stability of the timber?
A Independent test have shown no negative effect from the treatment. There will also be no dimensional change from the treatment.

 

Q Will the timber be more flammable?
A The timber is no more fire susceptible than normal untreated timber and has the same allowable use under the Building Code of Australia.

 

Q Is the treatment corrosive?
A No, bright steel fittings are suitable. Research by some the major nail plate producers indicate that there is no difference in withdrawal strength between treated and untreated timber. Same size nail plates can be used. H3 LOSP timber is intended for use outdoors and therefore the use of a galvanised or plated fastener is recommended. This should help prevent the formation of rust stains on the timber.

 

Q Does the treatment affect adhesives or paint?
A Extensive testing has proved that once dry there is no negative affect on adhesives or paints. Tests by leading plasterboard adhesive manufacturers confirm good adhesion to dry treated timber. Note: At all times the manufacturers guidelines should be followed.

 

Q What does one do about end cuts and remachining of timber?
A With good timber for treatment penetration can be right through the timber. There can be small amounts of untreated heartwood present, therefore where the end is exposed a brush on preservative can be applied. Where the cut end is butted up against a treated section, this may not be necessary, or possible. Heavily planed or rip sawn timber should not be used as this may reduce the protective effect.

 

Q How can I dispose of any treated wood waste?
A H2 LOSP termite resistant timber is not a hazardous waste and can be disposed of through normal waste disposal service. It may also be suitable for industrial incineration, but should not be used as heating or cooking fuel. H3 LOSP treated timber should be disposed of through normal waste disposal services. As LOSP treatment is intended for timber in its final shape and form, there should be no requirement for large industrial waste disposal.

 

(Source: http://www.losp.com.au/)

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